Hidden benefits of new homes

New Homes

Hidden benefits of new homes

by on Monday 26 January, 2015 in New Homes


In 2012, an analysis of England’s housing stock was conducted by the Department for Communities and Local Government. This study, which delved deep into the foundations of the housing market, presented a number of interesting conclusions prospective home buyer may wish to consider. Here are just a few of their findings.

Print

Houses built after 1990 account for just 2% of the nation’s repair costs
Unsurprisingly, modern homes require the least amount of spending per square metre than homes built before the 1990s. Homes built before 1919, which represent 20% of the total housing stock, accounted for over 40% of the repair bill. However, homes built after 1980, which represent 21% of the housing stock, account for just 6% of the total repair costs: the newer the home, the cheaper the repair bills.

 

Print

Homes built before 1990 are over four times more likely to be classed as ‘not decent’
In order to classify as ‘decent’, a dwelling must be in good repair, provide access to modern facilities and services and deliver a reasonable degree of thermal comfort. Over 20% of homes built between 1981 and 1990 classified as ‘not decent’. Conversely, only 2.5% of homes built after 1990 did not meet these standards. For houses built before 1919, almost 50% failed to meet these standards. Newer homes are of an increasingly higher standard, while older homes are failing to keep the pace.

Print

Houses built before 1980 are up to three times as likely to pose hygiene risks
Four criteria comprise the ‘hygiene’ rating of a property: space, layout, cleanability and location. In simple terms, the easier a house is to clean and maintain, the more likely it is to be classed as acceptably hygienic. Houses built before 1980 were, on average, over twice as likely not to meet acceptable levels of hygiene as their predecessors. In many cases, houses deemed ‘defective’ in terms of hygiene suffered dangerously poor layouts, ‘uncleanable’ surfaces and fixtures and unacceptably cramped kitchen and bathroom spaces. Newer homes are easier to maintain, safer to live in, and make far more effective use of space.

Print

Homes built after 1990 better accommodate mobility requirements
On average, 27% of houses built before 1990 were found to have no features supporting people with mobility requirements. The assessment criteria, comprising of four basic levels of suitability, is used to determine how many features each home has to support individuals requiring extra provisions to support mobility. In total, 24.7% of homes built after 1990 possessed the maximum number of required features. On average, only 2.8% of homes built before 1990 met the same standards. Newer homes are increasingly more functional for people of varying needs.

Tags:

buying a new home, new build homes, new builds, new homes,

Share this article:

Send us a comment